July192014
bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era
I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era

I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

(via theapplepoisoner)

July162014

teachingliteracy:

shanemaxwell:

I found this copy of Thoreau’s Walden buried in the park.  I opened it and saw these roots growing between the pages. I don’t know whether to frame it or put it back in the ground.

(via in-excelsis)

July102014
anguis218:

The Devil Leads A Soul To Hell Heinrich Aldegrever 1554

anguis218:

The Devil Leads A Soul To Hell Heinrich Aldegrever 1554

(Source: poisonwasthecure, via demoniality)

2AM

ancientart:

Bronze statuette of a veiled and masked dancer. Greek, 3rd–2nd century B.C.

The complex motion of this dancer is conveyed exclusively through the interaction of the body with several layers of dress.

Over an undergarment that falls in deep folds and trails heavily, the figure wears a lightweight mantle, drawn tautly over her head and body by the pressure applied to it by her right arm, left hand, and right leg. Its substance is conveyed by the alternation of the tubular folds pushing through from below and the freely curling softness of the fringe.The woman’s face is covered by the sheerest of veils, discernible at its edge below her hairline and at the cutouts for the eyes. Her extended right foot shows a laced slipper. This dancer has been convincingly identified as one of the professional entertainers, a combination of mime and dancer, for which the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria was famous in antiquity. (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections1972.118.95.

(via theredshoes)

June12014
sundegai:

 ”The Hermaphrodite [detail]” - Heinrich Khunrath’s “Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge”
Here we get a sense of the bafflingly complex nature of these images. The figure of the hermaphrodite as a metaphor for the dualistic nature of the universe and the human body is a common one in alchemical imagery. Likewise, the sun and moon are frequently used to symbolize the male and female natures inherent in different elements (the sun is gold/male, the moon female/silver, etc.) The black peacock labelled “AZOTH” leads us deeper into Hermetic territory. Azoth was the hypothesized universal solvent, the “ultimate substance” which could transform all elements. Here it seems to be used to convey the union of male and female (and of all elements) which would allow the corporeal human form to transcend to a divine plane (note the symbol of the trinity above the peacock feathers, which resemble diagrams of the celestial spheres). To top it all off, the “O” in “Azoth” made out of John Dee’s “hieroglyphic monad”!

sundegai:

 ”The Hermaphrodite [detail]” - Heinrich Khunrath’s “Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge”

Here we get a sense of the bafflingly complex nature of these images. The figure of the hermaphrodite as a metaphor for the dualistic nature of the universe and the human body is a common one in alchemical imagery. Likewise, the sun and moon are frequently used to symbolize the male and female natures inherent in different elements (the sun is gold/male, the moon female/silver, etc.) The black peacock labelled “AZOTH” leads us deeper into Hermetic territory. Azoth was the hypothesized universal solvent, the “ultimate substance” which could transform all elements. Here it seems to be used to convey the union of male and female (and of all elements) which would allow the corporeal human form to transcend to a divine plane (note the symbol of the trinity above the peacock feathers, which resemble diagrams of the celestial spheres). To top it all off, the “O” in “Azoth” made out of John Dee’s “hieroglyphic monad”!

(Source: resobscura.blogspot.com, via demoniality)

5PM
fleurdulys:

The Women of Eleusis- Jean Delville
1931

fleurdulys:

The Women of Eleusis- Jean Delville

1931

(via princessedesfees)

May62014

boomerstarkiller67:

Caspar David Friedrich

(via 1800s-enthusiast)

April152014
chickgonebad:


Pagan Gods - Astarte (mural), John Singer Sargent, c. 1895

Gorgeous

chickgonebad:

Pagan Gods - Astarte (mural), John Singer Sargent, c. 1895

Gorgeous

(Source: pagans-path, via goddess29)

1PM
1PM
April62014
ars-symbolica:

Jean Delville, L’Idole de la perversité (The idol of perversity)
1891, black chalk on paper, 81,5 x 48,5 cm, private collection (exhibited till June 9th in musée d’Orsay, Paris)

ars-symbolica:

Jean Delville, L’Idole de la perversité (The idol of perversity)

1891, black chalk on paper, 81,5 x 48,5 cm, private collection (exhibited till June 9th in musée d’Orsay, Paris)

10PM
neverstopthevortex:

La roue du monde - Jean Delville (1867-1953)

neverstopthevortex:

La roue du monde - Jean Delville (1867-1953)

10PM
uromancy:

Ignaz Unterberger. Hebe Jovis Aquilae Nectar minstrans (Hebe holding a cup of Nectar to Jupiter in the form of an Eagle). 1796.

uromancy:

Ignaz Unterberger. Hebe Jovis Aquilae Nectar minstrans (Hebe holding a cup of Nectar to Jupiter in the form of an Eagle). 1796.

(via holy-mountaineering)

April32014
melasangelos:

Adolf Hirémy-Hirschl, The Souls of Acheron (detail). 1898.

melasangelos:

Adolf Hirémy-Hirschl, The Souls of Acheron (detail). 1898.

(via in-excelsis)

3PM
drakontomalloi:

Charles Napier Kennedy - Perseus and Andromeda. 1890

drakontomalloi:

Charles Napier Kennedy - Perseus and Andromeda. 1890

(via in-excelsis)

← Older entries Page 1 of 78